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The political, social networking site that integrates politics with popular culture.

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Julia Wotten @juliaw

@twocents The problem with cheap energy is it is often harmful to the environment.

Feel free the read this article about the specifics of harmful energy sources: http://www.energy4me.org/energy-facts/environmental-protection/environmental-impact-by-source/

Our society is too reliant on fossil fuels at this point, which are harming our health and planet. Our government needs to invest in efficient green energy so that we can integrate this type of energy into our current systems. If we do switch over, the cost of traditional forms of energy such as fossil fuels will fall because the supply will increase as the demand stays the same. Factories and companies that are less willing to switch over could still utilize fossil fuel energy as long as they follow government regulations to keep the air clean and keep our waters clean. My suggestion would be to get more individuals off of fossil fuels and let the producers use it while heavily regulated for public safety.

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Ross Bryan @ross-bryan-31

@twocents
@juliaw

Is this something to be concerned about? Absolutely! But it doesn’t exactly spell the end of America as we know it. As noted by economist Walt Rostow (who served as the Special Assistant for National Security Affairs under LBJ), economies generally go through multiple stages of development:

1. Traditional society
2. Preconditions for take-off
3. Take-off
4. Drive to maturity
5. Age of High mass consumption

Right now, we’re at the age of overconsumption. Both We the People and our government have lived beyond our means for far too long and are now starting to feel the harsh effects. Whereas our government failed to address the problem of entitlements run amuck and a foreign policy gone wild, the American consumer spends like an idiot – purchasing oversized homes and foreign-made personal effects that neither he or she can afford, much less need. For the less politically astute, I recommend watching this episode of South Park:

China’s economy, on the other hand, is in the middle of its “take-off.” And Russia’s not doing too bad either. They’ll have a good run, but believe me, it’s not sustainable. Not in the long run.

The best way for American to remain globally competitive well into the Twenty-First century is to curb entitlements, pursue a sound monetary policy, invest in infrastructure at home, stop nation building overseas, and explore EVERY available means of weaning ourselves off foreign energy (while not discounting the value of sound environmental regulations). Oh, and a sane immigration policy would be nice, too!

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James L. Riggs @jlriggs57aol-com

@twocents
@juliaw
@ross-bryan-31

Two Cents, loved your last statement:

“Finally, energy. Cheap energy can give US manufacturers an advantage. If manufacturers energy costs are low, they can create the goods we need while paying workers fair wages.”

How absolutely true this is. We had so many of our jobs sent overseas because of the cost of running these plants and a big chunk of that was the cost of the energy it takes to run a large manufacturing operation. If they didn’t have to spend so much on overhead, not only could they make more money, but as you said, they could afford to pay a fair wage.

And giving credit where credit is due, there is a lot to be said for Ross’ last statement:

“The best way for American to remain globally competitive well into the Twenty-First century is to curb entitlements, pursue a sound monetary policy, invest in infrastructure at home, stop nation building overseas, and explore EVERY available means of weaning ourselves off foreign energy (while not discounting the value of sound environmental regulations). Oh, and a sane immigration policy would be nice, too!”

All true, Ross, all true.

There are a lot of things that could and should be done to get our manufacturing companies back into the U.S. One of the first things we should do is stop regulating businesses so heavily (maintain clean air, soil, and water) and give manufacturing some much needed tax breaks, etc.

But back to the topic at hand. The more efficient we can be at creating clean, economical energy the better of the country will be, not only for the sake of business but also for Mr. and Mrs. America when they get a smaller electric bill.

Julia, this is going to sound like I’m picking on you, but I hope you don’t take it that way, but…when you say things like….”Our government needs to invest in efficient green energy…..”, I sometimes get the feeling that you don’t get what you’re saying.

The U.S. government does nothing to make money, the only money the government has or will ever have comes from taxes, ie., our money. You could have just as easily said, “Our government should raise our taxes again to invest in efficient green energy….”

Instead of raising our taxes, which they love to do because it makes government bigger, I would go along with using my tax dollars to find a more efficient energy source if we could get rid of some of the stupid stuff we are paying billions of dollars for every year, like the mating rituals of the Rocky Mountain Spotted Toad-frog, or saving the Northeastern Longtrail Slime Snail. How about we worry a little less about the life span of a Wobble-eyed Woodtick and more about what will benefit the PEOPLE of this country. (Sorry if any of this sounded like a rant, I abhor gov’t waste.)

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